News Flash! Smash Bros. Dojo: The Obsessive Details

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Again, we’ve already posted the two blog posts that came before this: Control Scheme and Opening Movie. Check them out!


The Obsessive Details

Posted 9.7.2001


Today I’d like to switch gears (well, I’m not sure if we even had a set gear in the first place) and introduce some closeups that demonstrate our attention to detail.

Red Falcon’s back. Hellhawk! Machine no. 25! (Overseas, it’s going to be changed to Blood Hawk.)
Red Falcon’s back. Hellhawk! Machine no. 25!
(Overseas, it’s going to be changed to Blood Hawk.)
On the Great Fox, Peach’s hair and skirt flutters in the wind.
On the Great Fox, Peach’s hair and skirt flutters in the wind.
Of course when Samus fires missiles, her Arm Cannon opens up.
Of course when Samus fires missiles, her Arm Cannon opens up.
Fire Flowers drift slowly while they’re waiting to be picked up.
Fire Flowers drift slowly while they’re waiting to be picked up.
A closeup on the Super Scope. It even has the logo.
A closeup on the Super Scope.
It even has the logo.
Tingle and the Owl Statue. Great Bay’s layout has also been recreated.
Tingle and the Owl Statue. Great Bay’s layout has also been recreated.
A Klaptrap caught in a Barrel Cannon. ...You’re in the way.
A Klaptrap caught in a Barrel Cannon. …You’re in the way.
For the F-ZERO cars, we’ve recreated the designs from F-ZERO X.
For the F-ZERO cars, we’ve recreated the designs from F-ZERO X.
What Princess Peach’s Castle is famous for, the stained glass portrait of her prayer.
What Princess Peach’s Castle is famous for, the stained glass portrait of her prayer.

When you hear that a game is in development for two years, do you ever wonder “why does it take so long to make a game?”

For me, a game is a universe where if you let go of an apple, it won’t fall to the ground.

To drop an apple to the ground, you need to input the apple’s gravitational acceleration, it’s terminal velocity, its elasticity, air resistance, rolling resistance, etc.

To make it seem like it has the proper amount of weight, you need to make a lot of adjustments. If it’s going to make the game more fun, then you need to be even more careful.

Even before that, you need programs that will control the apple, and moreover you need someone to make the model of the apple.

But, this “unnaturalness” is what’s fun about games, and so I continue to work on games, sometimes making things realistic, sometimes deciding things arbitrarily.


Soma

Soma

Translation Team Leader at Source Gaming
I translate things, with the occasional written article here or there. My main game is Melee, so I’m pretty out of the loop when it comes to Smash 4 speculation and such.
Soma
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3 comments

  1. “When you hear that a game is in development for two years, do you ever wonder ‘why does it take so long to make a game?'”

    Oh, 2001. How young and naive we all were to how long game development cycles would become…

  2. I really like Sakurai’s explanation of why game development can take so long.
    Funny enough, it’s still food related. XD

  3. “For me, a game is a universe where if you let go of an apple, it won’t fall to the ground.

    To drop an apple to the ground, you need to input the apple’s gravitational acceleration, it’s terminal velocity, its elasticity, air resistance, rolling resistance, etc.”

    I absolutely love this quote, it’s technical to the point of asking “does anyone even care?” and decides to keep going anyway. I love that level of commitment. You can see elements of that level of design in the newer Smash games too; Lucina’s brand in her eye is one example that comes to mind. In a regular match, you’ll never see it, but it was added anyway to make it more faithful to her character.

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